Peonies: 8 Cost-effective Seasonal Alternatives

Our love affair with Peonies continues… and who could blame any blushing bride-to-be setting her heart on one of the most sought-after blooms to complete her bridal look. While their signature oversized heads allow fewer stems to fill a wedding bouquet with volume, their short season don’t make them the most budget-savvy choice and don’t forget – the bridesmaids will need smaller versions made up too.

Ironically the start of summer and the height of wedding season signals the end of our Peony season which runs only from April till about June. Every bride will be spoilt for choice with these gorgeous seasonal lookalikes…

Peonies: 7 Cost-effective Seasonal Alternatives © jennacarpenterphotography.co.uk
jennacarpenterphotography.co.uk

David Austen Roses – English, heritage, Juliet

Seasonality: October-May

Like peonies, David Austen Roses conveniently come in the most popular wedding-worthy hues – pastels, corals, neutrals and some, jewelled brights. Although slightly smaller than the Peony, varieties of the english rose have almost identical ‘power-puff’ petals that create the signature fluffy volume that we love so much. The english roses’ intricate array of romantic ruffled layers are the perfect substitute for Autumn and spring weddings.

 

Lisianthus

Seasonality: March – September

The bell-shaped Lisianthus bloushy petals make this flower undeniably similar to a Peony when in full bloom. Volume is easily achieved with the double-flowered form of this variety due to multiple blossoms per one stem, making this long-season variety a cost-effective mixer for a beautiful wedding bouquet. The tall stems and desirable longevity when cut, enable the use of this pretty blossoming flower to be added to bouquets, centrepieces and buttonholes.

Peonies: 7 Cost-effective Seasonal Alternatives © mrbrownthumb.blogspot.co.uk
mrbrownthumb.blogspot.co.uk

Cockscomb

Seasonality: September – November

The Cockscomb bloom with a compacted crested head and it’s distinct natural petal pattern is likened to a ‘coloured brain’. This flower’s large ruffled petal head and long leafy stems make this variety not only a great addition to a big bouquet but standout taller floral arrangements too.

Double Flowering Tulip

Seasonality: June – November

It isn’t until this flower opens up to reveal it’s centre that you see the resemblance of a Peony. Because of the similarity it isn’t uncommon to hear the double-flowering Tulip also called a ‘Peony-flowering Tulip’. Plentiful in the winter months, this inexpensive variety means no bride has to miss out on the summer season highlights if you are planning an Autumn/Winter wedding.

Peonies: 7 Cost-effective Seasonal Alternatives © kirstymackenziephotography.co.uk
kirstymackenziephotography.co.uk

 

Ranunculus

Seasonality: August – November

Another newly-found wedding flower favourite amongst brides – the texture and shape of the ranunculus is often mistaken for the peony when open. It’s paper thin petals form a more tightly packed and consistent circular shape giving them a slightly more uniformed look with the same elegant volume when in mass.

Football Mum ( Chrysanthemum)

Seasonality: August – October

The perfect Autumnal wedding bouquet addition, the ‘football’ and ‘spider’ variety of the chrysanthemum are known for their ball or globe-shaped heads. They are perfect partnered with other similarly larger headed blooms or used to bulk out half a dozen peonies if you’re being strict on costs.

Dahlias

Seasonality: June – October

Although they have a visually unique petal structure, the lion-like heads of the Dahlia posses an identical blousy effect and softly bulbous centre that make Peonies and Dahlias alike, so photogenic and romantic for your wedding day. The Dahlia is related to the daisy as well as the sunflower and the chrysanthemum and are perfect additions to a mixed bouquet of similarly large varieties.

Check out 11 more types of trending flower varieties to add to your wedding bouquet!

 

Which Peony-alternative would you pick for your bouquet?

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