You want your wedding to run as smoothly as possible, so you certainly haven’t got time to deal with a family feud!

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Odds are that there will be a few guests on your list that don’t always see eye to eye. We’ve looked at dealing with difficult divorced parents, and luckily a family feud that doesn’t revolve around your parents can often be easier to deal with.

There’s always the option of not inviting people who are involved in a family feud, especially if they are renowned for causing trouble. As the bride and groom, it is completely up to who you choose to invite.

family-feuds-janhendrik.comHowever, not inviting these people who are expecting an invite will probably lead to them asking some very awkward questions. You will need to try to explain to them, as carefully as you can, the reasons that they haven’t been invited. This in turn will probably give reason for more family-related arguments, so be careful how you go about this.

You could just try talking to the people in the family feud. Explain how important your wedding day is to you and that you would appreciate it if they behaved.. Tell them that if they do cause any problems, they will be asked to leave – give them the ultimatum of being civil, or face the humiliation of being escorted out in front of family and friends.

If they really feel they can’t forget about any disagreements or lay off the family feud for just one day, suggest that they go to the service but not on to the reception (alcohol often exasperates these problems!). People should respect that it’s your wedding day, and that you don’t want any extra hassle. Weddings should be joyous celebrations, definitely not shouting matches!

How are peoples family feud affecting your invitations?

Let us know

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